Reclining Adirondack Chair: Indoors and Outdoors


by Tonya Kerniva

      Let's play word association for a moment. Indoor seating: plush, comfy, oversized pillows, paisley. OK, the last one was just for show. Now, for outdoor furniture: wrought iron, plastic, loungers, uncomfortable (as if!) The reclining Adirondack chair wears two masks: it can function both as an outdoor piece of furniture or reside just as comfortably in the family den, sidled up next to the fireplace.

An outdoor reclining Adirondack chair is somewhat of a vague misnomer, because you have to specify just how "outside" your chair really is. Some chairs are relatively sheltered. If kept in a sun room you won't have to worry about waterproofing your furniture, but you will still have to consider direct exposure to sunlight and how that will affect blistering, peeling paint and fading wood coloration. The next level is a covered porch, somewhere halfway between indoors and out. Though protected from most rain, you still have to worry about wind damage, humidity, heat, sun, snow, etc. It worsens by degrees. Following this is that reclining Adirondack chair that you dare to keep outdoors from spring to autumn, but will suffice to cover it with a tarp come winter, or better yet, move it into storage. The worst case scenario is the poor chair left outdoors in rain or shine, year round, through hail, snow and all manner of abuse. Whatever your storage methodology, upkeep is key. The general rule of thumb for outdoor furniture is to apply oils and sealants about every once to twice a year, depending of course on your individual concerns, temperature, climate, etc. Paint should be reapplied only as needed. Also note, unfinished wood like teak will adopt a gray sheen over time. Do not worry; this process does not directly harm the wood in any way. Rather, it is the sun's natural patina process fading the wood into an aged, mature look. If that's not your thing, make sure you keep up on the varnishing. If you choose to add a little extra comfort factor by going with cushions, remember that outdoor patio cushions vary greatly from the indoor ones. Cushions intended for outdoor use are made from heavy duty, woven materials such as acrylic linen, olefin and PVC which are waterproof, resistant to tears, fading and mildew, and wipe clean with a damp cloth.

       An indoor reclining Adirondack chair has more leeway of design as it can be intricately carved and more ornately delicate because it does not have to battle the ravages of Mother Nature. These chairs have more variety as to the type of paint and varnished used because they don't necessarily have to be weather-proof. They are also able to be carved with more elaborate patterns and detailed designs that would otherwise wear away or rub off in time on outdoor furniture. If you choose to go with a wooden reclining Adirondack chair, be advised that most types of wood requires less regular oiling than do outdoor chairs. For instance, something like cedar will only need to be oiled about once a year. Some woods, especially the teak hardwood, requires almost no maintenance because it makes its own oils which function as well as, or better than, synthetic oils. The risk of over-oiling is the accumulation of unsightly black buildup. Indoor chairs can afford much nicer cushions with all manner of liner fabrics, like suede, cotton and more. Unlike the cushions of the outdoor reclining Adirondack chair, which consists of waterproof polyfill, indoor chairs can be stuffed with everything from cushy cotton to luxurious memory foam.


About the Author

Tonya Kerniva is an experienced research and free lance writing professional. She writes actively about Reclining Adirondack Chair and Recliners.




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